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Department of Specialist Ground Training

PRIZES AWARDED BY DSGT

The Beckwith Trophy and Prize

This Trophy is a silver rose bowl given to the College by Mrs H Z Beckwith in memory of her late husband, Air Vice Marshal W F Beckwith CBE BSc Eng ACGI CEng FIMechE FRAeS who died in 1971. From 1954 to 1957 he was Assistant Commandant at the RAF Technical College at Henlow. In 1937 Mrs Beckwith arranged for a trust fund to finance the award of a prize to the Trophy winner.

In 1986 the pattern of initial specialist training for engineer officers was modified. The existing basic courses were replaced by a much shorter common course entitled Engineer Officer Training Part 1; it was felt inappropriate to continue to award more than one prize for this course. In 1984 a scheme was introduced at the Royal Military College Shrivenham, to train Royal Air Force University Cadets to degree standard in electrical and mechanical engineering disciplines. The University Cadets are selected from both serving airmen and civilian entrants.

The trophy is awarded to the University Cadets at the Royal Military College who achieves the best results in the first year of the degree course. The Royal Military College holds the trophy on loan.

Winner 2001:

  • Flying Officer A J Main RAF

The Stuart Boulton Memorial Award

The Stuart Boulton Memorial Award was donated in 1990 by Mr and Mrs W Boulton in memory of their son, Cpl Stuart Boulton, who was killed in a Shackleton aircraft crash in that year. The award takes the form of a silver cup, which is retained by the Royal Air Force College Cranwell, and an engraved crystal goblet to be retained by each recipient.

The award was originally made annually to the Engineer officer who, having been commissioned from airman service and having completed training at the Royal Navy Engineering College Manadon, achieved the best performance of the year while on the Engineer Specialist Training Course. With the demise of training at Manadon, the award is now made annually to the Engineer officer who, having been commissioned from airman service in an aerosystems airman trade, achieves the best performance of the year while on the Engineer Specialist Course.

Winner 2001:

  • Flying Officer J B Morrison RAF

The Halahan Prize

In 1969 Miss Patricia Halahan offered a silver cup to the College, to be awarded as a prize. The cup was the one given to her father, the late Air Vice Marshal F C Halahan CMG OBE DSO MVO, Commandant of the College from 1926 to 1929, on his retirement in 1943. Air Vice Marshal Halahan died in 1965. From 1972, Miss Halahan gave a cheque for the purchase of book prizes up to the value of £50 each Prizes and Awards Year and, in February 1984, she authorized the founding of a trust fund to promote an increase in prize value from that year. At that time the Halahan Trophy awarded to the student undergoing training in the Aerosystems Specialization, who achieved the best all-round performance on each Basic Aerosystems Engineering Course. The Halahan prizes to the value of £100 and £50 in each Prizes and Awards Year were awarded to the best and the runner-up trophy winners respectively. In 1986 the pattern of initial specialist training for Engineer officers was modified. The existing basic courses were replaced by a much shorter common course entitled Engineer Officer Training Part 1 and then, in 1999, to the Engineer Specialist Training Course.

The annual prize is awarded to the student who achieves the best all-round performance of the Prizes and Awards Year on the Engineer Specialist Training Course.

Winner 2001:

  • Flying Officer J R Stephens RAF

The Royal New Zealand Air Force Trophies and Prizes

There are two identical Royal New Zealand Air Force Trophies. The first Trophy was presented to the College in 1957 as a flight cadet award. The second Trophy was presented to the Royal Air Force Technical College Henlow in 1961 and this Trophy was awarded to the cadet of the final year who showed the greatest originality in conception, planning, leadership and determination in carrying out a vacation activity of an adventurous nature. The College prize was for Commonwealth and war studies originally and later for proficiency in military studies and humanities subjects. Book prizes financed by the Royal New Zealand High Commission accompanied both the Cranwell and Henlow awards. When the Technical College was absorbed into the College at Cranwell in 1966 the Henlow Trophy continued to be used by the Department of Engineering, the first dual awards being made in 1974 to students of each specialization on the Maintenance Engineering Course. In 1986 the pattern of initial specialist training for engineer officers was modified. The existing basic courses were replaced by a much shorter common course entitled Engineer Officer Training Part 1 and it was felt inappropriate to continue to award more than one prize for this course. In 1984 a scheme was introduced at Royal Military College Shrivenham, to train Royal Air Force University Cadets to degree standard in electrical and mechanical engineering disciplines. The University Cadets are selected from both serving airmen and civilian entrants.

The Trophies are now awarded to the Royal Air Force University Cadets at the Royal Military College Shrivenham who achieve the best results in the respective electrical systems and mechanical systems degree courses. The Prizes, books up to the value of the sterling equivalent of 100 NZ dollars, are awarded to the winners. The Royal New Zealand High Commission meets the cost of the books and the Royal Military College Shrivenham holds the trophies on loan.

Winners 2001:

  • Flight Lieutenant W Rudge BEng RAF (Aeromechanical Systems Engineering Course)

  • Flight Lieutenant P J Searle BEng RAF (Electrical Engineering with Management Course)

The Air Vice Marshal Sir Thomas Shirley Memorial Cup and the Minerva Society Prize

Lady Shirley donated the Shirley Memorial Cup in 1982 in memory of her husband, the late Air Vice Marshal Sir Thomas Shirley KBE CB CEng FIEE FRAeS. Air Vice Marshal Shirley was Air Officer Commanding and Commandant of the Royal Air Force Technical College from 1957 to 1959 and a former President of the Minerva Society.

The Cup is awarded conjointly with the Minerva Society Prize. This Prize takes the form of a medal based on the Society Presidential Medal, together with books. The Minerva Society was formed in 1956 from graduates of No 1 Technical Cadet Entry of the Royal Air Force Technical College, Henlow, with the aim of fostering and perpetuating good fellowship among ex-technical cadets throughout their careers in the Service and afterwards. Society membership prospered, gaining members from Nos 1-13 Entries. It continued after the merger of the Technical College with the Royal Air Force College in 1966 and included a number of ex-flight cadet engineers from Nos 93-100 Entries. Membership closed after cessation of flight cadet training at Cranwell in March 1973. The Society originally awarded an annual prize for academic achievement to an engineering student after graduation from the College, but after 1972 the award was made for the best article by an Engineer officer on an engineering topic associated with flight safety which had appeared in a recognized publication. In 1982 the Society decided to award the Prize to the winner of the Shirley Memorial Cup in memory of its former president, Sir Thomas Shirley.

This is a conjoint award to the student of the Engineer Specialist Training Course who has achieved the best overall performance of the Prizes and Awards Year both in engineering studies and Initial Officer Training at the Royal Air Force College.

Winner 2001:

  • Flying Officer I Allen BSc RAF

The Herbert Smith Memorial Trophy

The Herbert Smith Memorial Trophy was endowed to the Royal Air Force College Cranwell in 1988 by Mrs Smith to honour the memory of her late husband. Herbert Smith (Honorary Companion RAeS) was born 1 May 1889 and died 30 December 1977. He was the Chief Design Engineer for Sopwith Aviation during the period 1914 to 1920 and was responsible for the design of the Sopwith One-and-a-half Strutter, Pup, Triplane, Camel, Snipe, Salamander, Dolphin and Cuckoo.

The Trophy is awarded to the student on the Advanced Systems Engineering Course adjudged to have achieved the best overall result in the applied technology phase of the Course.

Winner:

  • Flight Lieutenant A M Shipp BEng RAF

The Supply Prize

Since 1999 the Institute of Logistics and Transport have sponsored the Supply Prize. They have donated a silver trophy and and a book token to the value of £40. The Supply Prize was first awarded in 1978 to a student on No 318 Initial Supply Course; it was a silver cup and books to the value of £20.

It is awarded to the best of the Chartered Management Institute Prize for Supply Studies Prizewinners from Supply Officer Training Courses during each Prizes and Awards Year.

Winner 2001:

  • Flying Officer H Millar RAF 

The Whittle Prize

The Whittle Prize was founded by Air Cdre Sir Frank Whittle KBE CB MA CEng FRS FEng in 1954 to be awarded each year to the cadet at the Royal Air Force Technical College, Henlow, who submitted the best essay on a technical subject. On the absorption of the Technical College into the Royal Air Force College in 1966 the award continued, but the terms of the award were changed. Subsequently the Prize was awarded to the honours BSc degree student who submitted the best thesis in conjunction with his project. On cessation of flight cadet training a further change occurred. Sir Frank Whittle increased the value of the award from £20 to £30 and authorized MOD (Air) and the Air Officer Commanding and Comandant to set the terms of the award without referring their proposals back to him. From 1975 the Prize was awarded to the Aerosystems Engineering Course student who submitted the best individual project thesis. Very shortly afterwards the terms were again changed to those in use today, and with the introduction of the revised pattern of engineering training in the early 1980s the course was retitled as the Advanced Systems Engineering Course.

This prize is awarded to the student on the Advanced Systems Engineering Course who is adjudged to be the best student in terms of progress in studies and contribution to the success of the Course as a whole.

Winner:

  • Flight Lieutenant J L W Browning BEng RAF

The Worshipful Company of Engineers Prize

The Worshipful Company of Engineers first presented the Worshipful Company of Engineers Prize, an engraved medal and a certificate, in 1992 for students attending Engineer Officer Training Part 2 course.

The prize was awarded to the best student completing an EOT2 course during the previous year and was selected from the prizewinners of each course. Due to the pattern of training for Engineer Branch officers in 1999, the prize has been reallocated and is now awarded to the best direct entrant of the year from the Engineer Specialist Training Course.

Winner 2001:

  • Flight Lieutenant L R Vickers BEng RAF

The Hyde-Thomson Memorial Prize

The Hyde-Thomson Memorial Prize was founded in 1918 by the generous gift of Mr R D Hyde-Thomson in memory of his son Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Hyde-Thomson Royal Air Force, for the promotion of wireless telegraphy and kindred subjects in the Royal Air Force. Awards of the prizes were suspended in 1939 and only resumed under revised regulations in 1950. With the demise of engineering apprenticeships during 1993 the Trustees sanctioned further changes to the regulations governing the Award to perpetuate the link with ex-airmen.

The net annual income of the fund is to be divided equally between the best ex-airmen students graduating both Engineer Officer Training and Flying Training.

The engineering part of the award is to be made annually to an officer who was the best ex-airman with previous service in an electronics trade graduating from Engineer Specialist Training into employment in a communications-electronic appointment.

Winner:

  • Flying Officer K R Cranswick RAF

The Scientific Instrument Makers Award

The Worshipful Company of Scientific Instrument Makers Award was first presented in 1996. It is awarded annually to a member of the Department of Specialist Ground Training staff who has, in the opinion of the Director, made the most significant contribution to the Department's activities.

The prize is in the form of a medallion and an illuminated certificate. The winner is invited to receive it at the Admission Court Dinner. A scroll of the winners is to be drawn up and displayed in both Livery Hall and the Department of Specialist Ground Training.

Winner:

  • Flight Lieutenant N Hillary RAF

The Armourersí and Brasiersí Company Award

The Armourers' and Brasiers' Company Award was presented for the first time in 1998. The award is to encourage Royal Air Force Engineer officers to aspire to the highest standards whilst undertaking their initial specialist training.

The award is made annually to the most outstanding graduate in the academic element of the Engineer Specialist Training Course. The winner will receive an engraved medal from the Armourers' and Brasiers' Company together with a book of his or her choice, to the maximum value of £100. A suitably annotated bookplate is inserted in the book.

Winner:

  • Flying Officer M N Scott BEng AMIEE RAF

The Armourers' and Brasiers' Company Award (awarded to Advanced Systems Engineering Course)

The Armourers' and Brasiers' Company approached RAFC Cranwell in the year 2000 with the offer of a donation of an additional annual engineering prize to a student from the Department of Specialist Ground Training. The proposal was very much welcomed by the Department as it was seen to forge closer ties between the two organisations.

The Company's perception was that some Service Engineers and technicians are the modern equivalents of the armourers of old. The Company presents a medal and prize to the value of £150 that is awarded annually to the student from the Advanced Systems Engineering Course who completes the most outstanding project in the area of Weapons Systems Engineering. Only a sufficiently high standard will qualify for the award. The first award was made retrospectively and awarded at the Companies' Annual Dinner in July 2000, to a student on No 17 Advanced Systems Engineering Course.

Winner:

  • Captain B D Sells USAF

The Chartered Management Institute Prize

The Chartered Management Institute (CMI) prize originally started as a course prize on Supply Officer Training but following its transfer to the Intermediate Logistics Management Course (ILMC), IMgt amended the award to make it both a course and an annual prize. The winner for the annual prize is selected from the winners of the course prize during the training year. The Institute presents a cheque for £75 and the winners name is added to the CMI cup.

Winner:

  • Flight Lieutenant A J Baker RAF

The AFCEA Academic Prize

The AFCEA Prize is a new prize donated by the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA). It is awarded to a student on the Advanced Systems Engineering Course (ASEC) who has submitted the best individual project for their thesis in an electronic subject. The prize is cash and a 3 year membership of AFCEA. The prize is determined after the examination board has sat in the spring following course completion and is awarded at the Loughborough University graduation day (normally July)

Winner 2001:

  • Flight Lieutenant A M Shipp BEng RAF

 

COURSE PRIZES/AWARDS

The Chicksands Cup and Prize

The Chicksands Cup was originally presented to the Royal Air Force Technical College Henlow, by the United States Air Force Base at Chicksands in about 1955. The first award was made to the senior technical cadet of No 1 Entry who had most distinguished himself in academic and professional studies. There is no further knowledge of this trophy until the Technical College was absorbed by the Royal Air Force College to become the Department of Engineering in 1966. From 1967 onwards it was awarded annually to the flight cadet taking the BSc Honours Sandwich Course in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering who achieved first place in the order of merit. The winner also received a book prize to the value of £5. In 1970 the word "Sandwich" was deleted from the citation. The sum of £5 was received from Her Majesties Stationery Office vote. In 1973, with the graduation of the last flight cadet entry, the award became available to graduate entrants. The Cup was awarded to the graduate entrant of each Course who submitted the best paper on an engineering subject. Prizes of £10 each were awarded to the two students who respectively submitted the best papers of the intake year on electrical engineering and on mechanical engineering subjects. In 1975 the Cup and the Prize were re-united to be awarded annually to the graduate entrant who achieved the highest standard in professional studies on the Course, irrespective of specialization, in the intake year. In 1978 the award was opened to all students.

In 1986 the pattern of initial specialist training for engineer officers was modified. The existing basic courses were replaced by a much shorter common course entitled Engineer Officer Training Part 1; it was felt inappropriate to continue to award more than one prize for this course. In 1984 a scheme was introduced at Royal Military College Shrivenham, to train Royal Air Force University Cadets to degree standard in electrical and mechanical engineering disciplines. The University Cadets are selected from both serving airmen and civilian entrants. The University Cadet who, regardless of his source of entry to the Royal Military College Shrivenham, obtains the best first year result is awarded the Beckwith Trophy.

Until October 1991 the Chicksands Cup was awarded to the University Cadet at the Royal Military College Shrivenham who achieved the best results in the first year of the degree course and who entered the Service via a different route from that of the winner of the Beckwith Trophy. With the reduction in the number of direct entry cadets at Shrivenham difficulty was being experienced in awarding the Chicksands Cup because of the small number of cadets in the selection zone. It was therefore decided that the Cup would be withdrawn from Shrivenham after October 1991 and that it would become the award for the best student on each Engineer Officer Training Part 2 (Communication Electronics) course. The first award of the Cup to an Engineer Officer Training Part 2 (Communication Electronics) student was made in January 1992.

Due to the introduction of a new pattern of training for Engineer Branch officers in 1999, it was agreed that the prize be awarded in conjunction with Royal Aeronautical Society Prize and the Institute of Mechanical Engineers' prizes depending on the background of the student who achieves a noteworthy academic performance.

The Halahan Trophy

The history of the Halahan Trophy and the details of the Annual Halahan Prize are given earlier.

The Halahan Trophy is awarded to the student on each Engineer Specialist Training Course who achieves the best all-round performance.

The Chartered Management Institute Prize for Supply Studies

The Chartered Management Institute Prize for Supply Studies is a silver trophy and was presented to the College by the Lincolnshire Branch of the Chartered Management Institute in March 1990.

The Chartered Management Institute Prize is awarded to the student who achieves the highest standard in professional studies and has demonstrated good management potential on the Supply Officer Training Course Part 1.

The Loudon Trophy

The Loudon Trophy was donated by Sqn Ldr Loudon in 1983 in recognition of the successful efforts made by the Department of Specialist Ground Training in securing the future of his daughter, Pilot Officer S M Loudon, in the Supply Branch of the Royal Air Force.

The Trophy is awarded to the student on the Supply Officer Training Part 1 Course who is adjudged to have demonstrated communications skills of a level well above those normally associated with junior officers of a similar seniority. 

The Trophy is only to be awarded when the standard is adjudged to be sufficiently high.

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) Trophy and Prize

The Trophy is a Silver Gloster E28/39 Model and was given to the College by the IMechE in 1991. The Prize is a book selected and provided by the IMechE.

Until September 1994 the Prize was awarded to the student on each Engineer Officer Training Part 2 (Mechanical) course who achieved the best all-round performance.

In September 1994 the pattern of Engineer Officer Training Part 2 training was modified. The existing Engineer Officer Training Part 2 Avionics and Mechanics courses were combined to create an Aerosystems course. An award of either the IMechE prize or the RAeS prize, depending on the background of the nominated recipient, was made to the student who achieved the best all-round performance on each course completing Engineer Specialist Training (Aerosystems) Module. Following the revision of the pattern of engineering training in 1999, the Institute agreed that the prize could be transferred to the Engineer Specialist Training Course in conjunction with the Royal Aeronautical Society and Chicksands prize, to be awarded to the student who achieves a noteworthy academic performance.

The Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) Trophy and Prize

The Trophy is a Silver Kestrel Model and was given to the College by the RAeS in 1991. The Prize is a book token for £20 presented by the RAeS together with a certificate.

Until September 1994 the Prize was awarded to the student on each Engineer Officer Training Part 2 (Avionics) course who achieved the best all-round performance.

In September 1994 the pattern of Engineer Officer Training Part 2 training was modified. The Engineer Officer Training Part 2 Avionics and Mechanics courses were combined to create an Aerosystems course. Further changes to the pattern of Engineer Officer Training, now mean that the award of either the RAeS prize or the IMechE prize, (depending on the background of the nominated recipient), is made to the student who achieves the best all-round performance on each course completing Engineer Specialist Training (Aerosystems) Module. In 1999 the new pattern of training was introduced for Engineer Branch officers. RAeS agreed that the prize could be transferred to the Engineer Specialist Training Course in conjunction with the IMechE and Chicksands prize and awarded to a student who achieves a noteworthy academic performance.

The Penelope Kitt Memorial Prize

Flight Lieutenant Allan Kitt donated the Penelope Kitt Memorial Prize in 1995, in memory of his wife Flight Lieutenant Penelope Kitt of the Supply Branch who died tragically in a road traffic accident.

The prize is awarded to the student on Supply Officer Training course who, through hard work and commendable effort, is adjudged to be the best student in terms of progress in professional studies and contribution to the overall success of the course.

The Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply Prize

The Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply prize is awarded and presented to the Supply Officer Training Part 2 course member adjudged to be the best student in terms of achievement in studies, contribution to the success of the course overall and potential for the future.

The Institute presents a trophy, which is retained by the Department, and a book token at the end of course conference. (This award is currently under review.)

The Parsons Memorial Trophy

Mrs Polly Parsons donated the Parsons Memorial Award to the Department of Specialist Ground Training (DSGT) in 1999. It was awarded in memory of her late husband, Group Captain Andy Parsons OBE BSc ACGI. Group Captain Parsons was the Director DSGT from April 1992 until November 1994. His son, Dr Chris Parsons presented the first award, to a student from No 1 Engineer Specialist Training Course.

The award is made to a student from an Engineer Specialist Training Course who has demonstrated outstanding perseverance and diligence in successfully completing his or her studies. The prize is not awarded on every course, only in circumstances of exceptional merit. The award takes the form of a prize, which is a silver plated model of a GR4 Tornado. The Department retains the trophy and the recipient retains an awards certificate.

 


Date Last Updated : Monday, December 8, 2003 10:00 AM

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